Decca’s 90th

Decca is a sexy brand.

I love the typeface. I adore the logo. It promises quality.

An extensive back catalogue stored in a temperature controlled environment where the staff are contractually obliged to wear cotton gloves at all times.

Not impressed by their guest list. Probably should have checked my spam folder.

That said, I am in my mid-forties. And yesterday was quite a full-on day.

Even so, it would have been nice to have been invited.

Pro tip: there’s nothing worse than being sent an email with pictures of an event that I never had an opportunity to attend.

However, Decca’s profile in its 91st year is impressive.

The collection of pictures from its birthday shindig reminds me of the significant part its played in various classical recordings I’ve enjoyed over the years. Recordings which, whenever I scower Spotify I always end up selecting whenever I see it: trusted brand; our version of Deutsche Grammophon; as good as we could be – kind of.

Decca have bold aspirations about its 90th birthday celebrations too.

Decca 90 will demonstrate why its early mission statement of being “The Supreme Record Company” is as relevant today as ever.

Decca90

Terrifying.

Most recently, it’s secured a strong foot in the door of a reasonably valuable distribution ‘partner’ thanks to BBC Young Musician, the missed opportunity Our Classical Century, and various ‘BBC Sounds’ vehicles including This Classical Life presented by 20-year-old Jess talking to other young musicians about their ‘musical discoveries’. Less of an editorial proposition, more of a talent-led vehicle for a record company signing. No surprise this isn’t a programme targetted at me. Hence why I didn’t receive a press release about that either. Someone’s doing their research at least.

All this cynicism aside, Decca’s 90th – more perhaps than the BBC’s centenary in a few years time – is an important reminder about how specialist music has maintained its audience over the past century.

Raise a glass to the technical pioneers of 90 years ago, and those who saw money to be made. Something we all take for granted,

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